March Blog

Why a smaller yoga class offers bigger benefits and how to find the right class for you …12th

yoga-quote-image

Whilst some enjoy the buzz of practicing in a large class or at a festival, there’s much to be said for finding a smaller class for your yoga practice. You’ll often discover a more relaxed environment where you feel able to ask questions and – as a total bonus, occasionally you may find that class numbers drop for a week – for holiday periods for example – thus treating yourself to an even more personal instruction!

SEEING THE TEACHER CLEARLY

images1PJLK6AM

When you’re in a small class, (at Bodhi we teach a maximum of seven students per class)your teacher is often always visible. You’re not in the sixth row, craning your neck around someone else to see what that pose you are being walked through looks like! You’ll also be able to hear your teacher clearly above the other students’ mindful breaths. Seeing and hearing your instructor can help you  land your poses correctly the first time, instead of six or seven crowded classes later when you finally receive an adjustment.

THE TEACHER NEEDS TO SEE YOU TOO!

If it’s hard for you to see your teacher, it’s probably hard for her to see you, too. But in a small class your yoga instructor can easily see when your triangle pose isn’t opened quite right. Whilst a small class makes it easier to make a personal adjustment, with full vision its also easy to just state from the front of the class a common mistake in the pose, causing you to realise your error and make the adjustment on your own.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PERSONAL CONNECTION

downdog

 

Practicing in a smaller studio makes it easier to forge a personal connection with your yoga teacher—and for her to do the same with you. By seeing you regularly in an intimate class setting she’ll know your strengths and weaknesses. She’ll be able to see you struggle with balance poses but have the best downward dog in the class. Beyond your practice, she can get to know your personal side and what you do between yoga classes, like training for a marathon, chasing children, or teaching on your feet all day. A really good yoga instructor will provide advice and know what to add to the class to help you feel your best.

MEETING NEW PEOPLE DOESN’T NEED TO BE HARD

In a big studio you’re more likely to sit down on your mat and stretch out on your own before class starts.  Whilst you can still find space to do this in a smaller studio often large classes can be quite intimidating environments to try and connect with new people – when it’s just a few of you in  the studio, it seems easier to introduce yourself and share a few bits of info if you feel so inclined!

HOW A SMALLER CLASS CAN HELP BUILD YOUR CONFIDENCE

confidence

Gaining confidence comes with any yoga practice as you better get to know your body. But when your instructor has time to acknowledge good alignment or celebrate the fact that you finally hit the pose you’ve been working on for months (because she knows how hard you’ve been working) it gives you a surge of confidence and a desire to keep moving forward

Of course, you could list a number of reasons why small studios aren’t perfect –  the main one being that some have limited class offerings. At Bodhi we offer the following classes and the opportunity to take advantage of 1-2-1 sessions which suit you best – including Saturdays!

Monday              8.30 & 20.00

Tuesday              9.30 & 19.00

Wednesday        18.45 & 20.00

Thursday            19.00

Friday                 10.00

You can check out our classes at http://bookwhen.com/bodhi

Be_a_Warrior_Hot_Yoga

Truthfully though, even where class timings are a little more limited, the pros outweigh the cons for those of us looking for something a little more intimate – something a little more personal. If you want to find a place where you feel comfortable and welcome, a place where your teacher will have the time, the knowledge and the care to help you develop a sustainable practice that grows as you do, why not come along to Bodhi studio.  We think you’ll like it

March